What Makes An Air Mover Professional Grade?

For those of you in the industry of using air movers, has it ever occurred to you what makes an “air mover” professional grade? After all, manufacturers like to differentiate their professional grade air movers from the garden variety knock-offs that are popping up all over the internet. You know these knock offs as no name Chinese junk. They insist that their air movers are built to be of better quality, durability and virtually maintenance free but what exactly makes an air mover “professional grade,” you know what I mean?

Are the fan motors inside made with certain materials that are both lightweight and durable? Is the housing made to be impact resistant in case you drop the machine? Or maybe the motor’s housing is designed to be a single sealed unit that both prevents debris from jamming the unit and it’s made to withstand extreme temperatures from both end of the spectrum?

These are questions that any person, be it a professional or the everyday average Joe or Jane should ask oneself. After all, wouldn’t it be good to know these things before dropping a good few hundred (or in some cases, a few thousand) dollars on any said unit from any said manufacturer? Everyone wants to know that they are getting their money’s worth, right? And not just simply buying a marketing ploy that sounds nice on paper but doesn’t actually perform up to its claims? By now, everyone knows (or should know) that manufacturers are engaging in some pretty ‘interesting’ ploys to get people to buy more of their stuff even if it’s the same old product that they’ve designed and produced from several decades ago. Think about it. Several decades ago. That means you could be buying a product that they first designed and produced from back in the 1960’s and 1970’s. The only difference being how they re-packaged it and represent it in today’s times via massive marketing campaigns and constant media blasting until your deaf and numb from the sensory overload. And when your senses are overloaded, you tend to make impulsive decisions, which result in impulsive buying of merchandise and services you don’t really need or want.

Given that, as a professional or an average Joe or Jane, you should ask yourself a few questions:

1. What is it about this air mover that sets this apart from other air movers?

2. Why is this air mover considered professional grade as opposed to the competition?

3. What are the specifications of a professional grade air mover?

4. What are the specifications of a regular home use air mover?

5. What materials are used to make the air mover’s motor?

6. What materials are used to make the housing of the air mover?

7. What role does CFM and RPM play into the quality of the air mover?

The last question is actually a marketing ploy that most manufacturers tout as their primary selling point. When it comes to air movers, they insist that the CFM and RPM matter but the reality is that there’s no set standard as it is right now in the industry. There’s no way to really “gauge” how much CFM (or RPM) an air mover unit from one manufacturer actually produces relative to another air mover unit from a different manufacturer. In short, the whole CFM and RPM marketing ploy that manufacturers use is not regulated by any independent body at all. So what ends up happening is that manufacturers can make any kind of claim, however outrageous that it sounds.

There are certainly more questions that one should ask oneself but these are the main one’s that come to my mind when I’m considering an air mover as an average Joe or Jane. And I have a hunch that for the professional user using this for their business or as a worker for a business, that these are also the same questions that come to mind. Maybe not at first but over time as one uses the unit and realizes, “Well, gee, this unit sure takes a long time to dry these carpet floors” or some such similar epiphany.

Product Recommendation from Goo Wak Jai: XPOWER P-830 1HP Air Mover

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